Posts Tagged ‘sculpture’

Happy Easter

Saturday, March 19th, 2016

Sculptural forms – architecture

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

A couple of weeks ago I found myself in a small clearing in the middle of a forest amidst a medley of exciting experimental buildings. I was at Hooke Park in Dorset, an educational facility owned by the Architectural Association and set in 150 acres of working forest.

The buildings were particularly interesting because they combined innovative architectural design with the use of forest thinnings, timber not usually considered of economic value. Other cheap materials such as fabrics were widely used too.

It just so happens that I am in the process of designing a tractor shed for our old Leyland, now I am seeing all timber buildings with new eyes and am having to revisit my designs.

The visit to Hooke Park was followed a few days later, although only coincidentally, by a film and discussion at the University of Bath on Frank Gehry (Sketches of Frank Gehry – a documentary film by Sydney Pollack).  I have visited the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao twice and each time this massive sculptural building has not failed to impress me however the buildings in the wood also defied the need for straight lines, were more modest and more achievable.


Sustainable sculpture

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

Sculpture in the garden can act either as a focal point or as an element of surprise enlivening an otherwise dull area of wall or a dark shady corner.  Right now during Somerset Arts Weeks you will be able to see many different forms of sculpture: bronze, stone, steel, wood, ceramic and willow…  My medium is willow and other natural materials (silver birch, leaves, field maple, dogwood…), woven into simple forms highlighting the colours and textures of the materials.

Willow is an amazing material, exploited for its pliable stems and ability to regenerate after cutting.   It has been used for thousands of years woven into functional objects such as baskets, fish traps, fences, tracks for roads over boggy ground… It is a truly sustainable material and traditionally most small holdings would have had their own stand of willow for ongoing repair and making of new structures.

My willow sculptures not only do they slowly return to nature in the garden but often birds nest in them during this process.  I harvest my materials in the winter from the garden, local hedgerows and withy beds on a completely sustainable basis.  Sculptures outside will last approximately 2 years however given a bit of shelter (north facing wall or under a lean-to) will last much longer.

Exhibition at Glastonbury Abbey

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

I have been working towards a joint exhibition with Angie Rooke (landscape painter) and Jo Lucksted (ceramics) at Glastonbury Abbey which opens on Saturday.  It is a lovely event and venue – an oasis in the middle of a busy market town.  From the exhibition you can see carpets of snowdrops and crocus and if you venture out into the extensive grounds you might find the Ginkgo biloba from which I collected leaves in the autumn and then experimented with in my studio (the results are on show!).  Do come along, the exhibition runs until 4th May and when the weather warms up there is an outdoor cafe!

Garden leaves

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Leaves of Hemerocallis, Iris, Crocosmia, bluebell and reed from the pond can be put to second use.  At this time of year I have a quick tidy up of my collection of Iris and Hemerocallis plants in the garden.   Once the leaves have faded, I dry them out and store them until I have some time to do some weaving, then I soften them in a damp towel for up to 6 hours then weave away…

Dragon making – Nr Bath

Friday, July 4th, 2014

I have just completed a very enjoyable 3 day residency in a local school during which time we built a 6 metre long dragon!

Art and glamping

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Glastonbury Festival kicks off today, I have installed some of my larger willow forms throughout one of the exclusive camp sites just outside the fence.  These special ‘glamping’ guests will each have with their own magical garden areas complete with local willow art work.


 

Garden sculpture

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

My garden sculptures in client’s garden.  The sculptures have been in situ for 3 years now, they are set at the front of the client’s home and are lit at night from within.

Moorwood Art

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

I have been invited to show some of my large abstract willow forms in the beautiful woodland garden of  Moorwood, Redlynch, Bruton BA10 0NJ

The exhibition will be open daily from 12th to 16th November 10.00am – 4.00pm

Tudor Square, Sheffield

Monday, September 17th, 2012

I find city breaks to be inspirational and this was once again true on a recent trip to Sheffield for a friend’s wedding.   As the bus approached the city centre I was struck by the harsh sky-scape, I could see some interesting architecture but noted the absence of mature trees.  However when I got off the bus and walked around the corner into Tudor Square I found myself in the middle of some very beautiful of public landscaping.

Giant pebble shaped raised beds carved from Yorkshire stone and huge cast bronze pebble sculptures.  The stone beds are reminiscent of giant bonsai containers, they are planted with specimen conifers, multi-stem birch, turf to picnic on or mixed plantings of Stipa tenuissima, and herbaceous perennials; a permanent sculptural installation, a fine example of art, design and horticulture.  The pebbles nestled around the edge of the square, grounding the surrounding buildings, tactile and organic.

Sheffield city centre is a fascinating place if you enjoy architecture and civic landscaping, check out the ‘Cheesegrater’, the ‘Soundhouse’, West Street for some interesting examples.

On the way home I stopped off at Chatsworth house to see Laura Ellen Bacon’s ‘Forms of Growth’ breathtaking examples of organic sculpture .