Posts Tagged ‘design’

Gravel steps – Nr. Bristol

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

This is a garden I designed in 2014 and was installed by the clients during 2015.  We were dealing with a slope and had the issue of underground services close to the surface.  The oil tank was moved, patios at the back enlarged and new retaining walls built.

My clients kindly sent me the pictures, I have copied in their email:

Dear Angela
Just thought you might like to see these photos of the garden now the trellis is in place
We are so pleased…
If you ever need trellis etc in your work we wouldn’t hesitate to recommend the company we used… Stuart Garden Architecture based in Wiveliscombe
Kind Regards
C

Gardening on an angle – Nr. Shepton Mallet

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

This is a garden I designed in 2014, the client has planted it as a white garden and is finding out that white flowers are not always white.  So which are good whites?

Viola cornuta ‘Alba’
Choisya ternata ‘Alba’
Armeria maritima ‘Alba’
Digitalis purpurea ‘Alba’
Allium ‘Mount Everest’
Cosmos ‘Sonata
Pulmonaria ‘Sissinghurst White’
Hesperis matrionalis
Phlox
‘Mount Fuji’

to mention a few…

Garden design – Bath

Monday, April 25th, 2016

New garden design challenge, a 10 metre drop and 4 south facing terraces. We are planning a formal layout with Mediterranean style plants which when viewed from the house will work as a whole, a bit like a painting.

Wind swept garden

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

I am working on an exciting yet challenging project – a front line sea-side garden at Burton Bradstock in Dorset.  Last year I visited the site on a lovely summers day, this week when I returned, storm Imogen lashed at the sea and land alike, it was good to be reminded of the power of nature.

I have yet to start the planting plan however I do not foresee any large plants in the front garden, although there is an existing 1.1 metre high wall to provide a tiny degree of shelter. To add to my challenge, there are rabbits on site too!

Sculptural forms – architecture

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

A couple of weeks ago I found myself in a small clearing in the middle of a forest amidst a medley of exciting experimental buildings. I was at Hooke Park in Dorset, an educational facility owned by the Architectural Association and set in 150 acres of working forest.

The buildings were particularly interesting because they combined innovative architectural design with the use of forest thinnings, timber not usually considered of economic value. Other cheap materials such as fabrics were widely used too.

It just so happens that I am in the process of designing a tractor shed for our old Leyland, now I am seeing all timber buildings with new eyes and am having to revisit my designs.

The visit to Hooke Park was followed a few days later, although only coincidentally, by a film and discussion at the University of Bath on Frank Gehry (Sketches of Frank Gehry – a documentary film by Sydney Pollack).  I have visited the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao twice and each time this massive sculptural building has not failed to impress me however the buildings in the wood also defied the need for straight lines, were more modest and more achievable.


What does your garden say about you?

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Last week I was shown around a friend’s garden, it was a long garden in a country setting, narrower at the house end (but not too narrow) and a little wider at the far end. The borders were deep and defined by a meandering grass path, sometimes wide, sometimes narrow – a bit like the course of a lazy river. I see a lot of gardens and this was refreshing, it felt peaceful and private, there were several benches and a lovely carved log bird bath which apparently a small frog occasionally visits!

The beds were mostly weed free but there were pockets of bindweed and ground elder – my friend’s attitude is relaxed with regards to these, she deals with them as and when. This is also her approach to the garden as a whole, she looks after the grass path but doesn’t become a slave to the borders. This fine balance of gardening and enjoying the garden is something I think most people fail to achieve, myself included. Wonderfully refreshing, thank you Ann.

Formal and informal – Devon

Friday, May 29th, 2015

In it’s first year of planting, this wild flower meadow has been designed to reach right into the heart of the formal garden. From here you can step out over the river to glorious Devonshire meadows whilst insects and birds are invited in with rewards of safe nesting in the walls of the kitchen garden.

This finger like meadow creates contrast with the formal canal, rill and clipped hedges (when they have grown that is). It is planted with 1000′s of spring bulbs and wildflower perennials.




The wildflower mix is from Emorsgate Seeds: Cornfield annuals mix http://www.emorsgateseeds.co.uk/

Natural stone in the garden

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

Old stone properties usually have a disused pile of stone somewhere in the garden whilst local quarries are exciting places to source from.

These projects: Devon, Dorset and Somerset illustrate how stone can be used creatively linking garden with the larger landscape.

Dry stone walls – perfect for wildlife

Pub garden

Saturday, October 11th, 2014

Last autumn I designed a pub garden, the brief changed many times as did the budget, eventually I only worked on the concept and planting.  I planted in April this year, in fact the budget was so tight I even raised  a lot of the plants myself.  Yesterday I was passing by and was delighted to see how established the planting is  looking, it struck me that the strong organic shape of the paths had a hint of Oudolf Meadow about them  (Piet Oudolf’s new garden at Hauser and Wirth near Bruton)!

Wildlife garden progressing well – Devon

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

One year on in the build, two years on in the design and we are almost ready for planting.  The garden has been levelled, using low retaining stone walls, into 4 separate gardens based on the original slope of site.  A rill garden, a canal and an upper pool garden will all be enclosed with yew hedging this autumn.  The majestic kitchen garden lime mortar walls are almost finished.  There are many beautiful details in the stonework in this garden and a huge boulder serves as a stepping stone through the canal via the central axis path.

This is a wildlife garden designed for low maintenance and low impact on the environment.  The canal already attracts swallows, they create stunning acrobatic displays as they swoop down and drink from the canal.  All the pools have egress points for the creatures it may attract.  The kitchen garden walls have nesting holes built into them, all the other walls have recessed pointing to encourage plants to grow in them and to offer shelter to small creatures.  Lime mortar  is used throughout.  Lawns will be planted with daisy and Prunella and cut less frequently than most lawns.  There will be trees and hedges which are beneficial to wildlife on so many different levels and borders will be planted with plants providing a long season  pollen and nectar.

Months of hard work have gone into this garden already by an excellent team of builders.  The design of the garden is the result of a partnership between myself and my client – a very exciting project.